Tag Archives: forbidden city

Happy Halloween from China Icons

News and Travel Editor

Happy Halloween from everyone at China Icons! To mark the occasion, we thought we’d share some of China’s spookiest stories, past and present. Read on, if you dare…

Ever seen The Ring or The Grudge? Did you know these films were inspired by one of the most famous ghost stories from China, known as the Tale of Painted Skin? The tale originates from the Qing dynasty and tells the story of a lost young woman roaming the streets (who, of course, later turns out to be a vengeful female spirit) who is discovered by a scholar. He of course offers her a place to stay. Despite warnings from a Taoist monk that he has been bewitched by the woman, the scholar continues to allow her to stay, leading to particularly grim consequences for his family. Click here if you fancy a read of the short story (Definitely one to read with the lights on).

Hungry Ghosts are also extremely common in Chinese culture and Buddhist tradition. Hungry Ghosts are the spirits of people who were greedy or had sinned in their previous lives and have bulging stomachs and tiny mouths. They appear during ‘Ghost Month’ in China and some Chinese families will burn ‘Hell Money’ and provide offerings of food and drink in order to ward off trouble from coming to their households.

We all know about China’s Forbidden City, but did you know it’s also said to be haunted by a variety of ghosts dating back to the Ming dynasty in the 15th century? Murders committed by guards and imperial concubines were common at the time, so it’s unsurprising that stories and rumours have circulated for years. Emperor Yongle of the Ming dynasty also committed suicide during an uprising, only after forcing his wife to commit suicide as well as going on a murderous rampage against other family members.

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Emperor Yongle. Image by Shizhao

Their ghosts still allegedly roam the Forbidden City, so it’s perfect for a spooky Halloween ghost walk if you happen to be in Beijing and believe in this sort of thing. Don’t panic, you can only really visit the Forbidden City in the day with thousands of other tourists – I doubt any ghosts would even want to make an appearance it’s so busy!

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Image by Pixelflake

Don’t worry, there are a few stories of kind and friendly ghosts in Chinese culture as well! The legend of the Chinese ghost hunter, Zhong Kui, tells the tale of a scholar who killed himself after being stripped of his title by the emperor. When he returned from the dead, he decided to subdue evil spirits rather than join them. Many Chinese people have Zhong Kui’s picture hung up in their homes and businesses as a protector!

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Zhong Kui and a demon. Image by Paul K. Attribution CC 2.0.

So there you have it. We hope for your sake this wasn’t your bedtime reading…

Are there any Chinese ghost stories you’d like to share that we haven’t mentioned here? We’d love to hear them!

National Day and the Secret of Chairman Mao’s Portrait

News and Travel Editor

National Day is celebrated on October 1st to mark the formation of the People’s Republic of China.

Traditionally, celebrations kick off with a flag raising ceremony in Tiananmen Square followed by a parade and fireworks. Since 1999, celebrations have expanded to include a 7 day vacation, known as ‘golden week’. Many Chinese people use this time to travel and get together with their families.

Another tradition which takes place every October for National Day isn’t quite as well known.

Do you recognise this image?

453px-Mao_Zedong_portrait.jpg

As you may have guessed, this is the portrait of Chairman Mao that hangs at the entrance to the Forbidden City.

What about this one?469px-Mao.jpg

Or this one? 800px-The_portrait_of_Mao_Zedong.jpg

Confused yet? Every October for China’s National Day, the portrait of Mao at the Forbidden City gets a makeover in the dead of night.  Few people in the world have seen this happen. Watch how they do it below, and see if you can spot the differences yourself!

How are you celebrating National Day this year? Let us know in the comments below!