Category Archives: Travel In China

China’s New Silk Road: 12,000 km from the UK to China

News and Travel Editor

Welcome to China Icons’ first ever 4K video, and what a subject to start on!

The UK is the latest country to ‘get connected’ to China’s latest global innovation, the One Belt One Road Initiative. It’s a rejuvenation of the ancient, 2,000 year-old Silk Road, arguably made famous by the traveller and explorer Marco Polo. China and the UK are now connected via one of the most innovative rail links in the world.

Join us as we travel 12,000 km to the other side of the globe from London in the UK to Yiwu on the eastern edge of China.

From electronic equipment to toys and games, the train will be transporting almost anything you could possibly think of.

Find out what it takes to launch one of the most ambitious projects the world has ever seen and re-live the celebrations in London as the train departs to Yiwu.

Don’t forget to check out our other blog on some of the highlights along the 12,000 km route, from the Russian wilderness to the mild climate of China’s eastern coast. This isn’t the only celebration of China’s ‘New Silk Road’, horticultural designers have created a Silk Road garden at the world famous RHS Chelsea Flower Show. Check out their incredible efforts here.

A Journey Across Continents: The London to Yiwu Train

News and Travel Editor

Today marks the end of a historic 7,500 mile freight train journey from London, UK, to Yiwu, China. Carrying everything from pharmaceuticals to milk powder and soft drinks, it’s the first ever journey on this route and marks a significant moment for trading relations between the UK, Europe and China. But its not been without difficulty – the train has ventured through 9 countries, from freezing Russian wilderness to the mild climate of China’s eastern coast. This blog visits some of the highlights along its route and looks at why this train journey is so important.

This is the first ever direct cargo train carrying British goods from the UK to China. This may seem like a modern innovation, but the train is actually reviving the 2,000 year-old Silk Road, an ancient link between the east and west. As well as contributing to the recent Chinese initiative of the New Silk Road, transporting goods to China from the UK via freight train is twice as fast as transporting them by sea and the costs are tiny compared to transporting by air. This is a time and cost effective solution, not to mention it passes through 7,500 miles of glorious scenery.

Cosmopolitan Western Europe

After leaving London Gateway, the train passes through the bright lights of Western Europe, from Paris and Brussels to Duisberg and Warsaw. This sounds like a great opportunity for a whirlwind tour of Europe, aboard one of the most important freight trains in the world today.

The Freezing Russian Winter

Just as you’ve got used to the mild climate of western Europe, the train was fully immersed in the gloriously tropical  -40°C winters of the Russian wilderness. Beautiful it may be, there’s no doubt the train driver need their winter woolies.

The Plains of Kazakhstan and Xinjiang

Here, the journey becomes even more beautiful. The train has journeyed through thousands of miles of beautiful plains of grassland, mountains and deserts. Where do we sign up to be the driver again?

Yiwu: The Final Destination

After 7,500 miles, the train has travelled through virtually every landscape and climate imaginable, and has finally arrived in Yiwu, one of China’s manufacturing and international trading centres. We can expect the train to make many more trips over the next few years, with other Silk Road trains making the trip up to 500 times each year! Judging from the photos of highlights along the route, one thing is for certain: whoever gets the job of driving the train halfway across the world is the luckiest person in the world.

 

 

China’s Top 10 Adrenaline-Fuelled Atrractions

News and Travel Editor

It’s the travellers’ rite of passage – experiencing unforgettable, thrill seeking experiences on your gap year or travels abroad.

If you are after a nail biting, vertigo-inducing, unforgettable experience on your next trip to China, this top 10 list is of jaw dropping, adrenaline-rush activities is handpicked by China Icons for you.

Sheldon blog

In at No 10: Lehe Ledu Wildlife Zoo, Chongqing

This unique zoo has created waves in the animal rights kingdom and has masses of international press coverage. Taking inspiration from cage diving with sharks, they switch the traditional idea of a zoo on its head, with humans being the ones put in cages. Entering the land of the lions and tigers, visitors are able to feed the animals through gaps in the fence. Personally, I would prefer there to be NO GAPS, when it comes between me and a hungry predator.  Not for the faint hearted.

No 9: Cliff swing at Wansheng Ordovician Theme Park, Chongqing

It’s a swing with a difference – a 300m/1000ft cliff top drop under your favourite childhood playground ride.    You’d be forgiven for forgetting to enjoy the stunning backdrop of southern Chongqing during this ride.

No 8: Glass Bridge, Mount Langya, Hebei

China’s latest glass bridge 450 metres high above a rocky gorge provides tourists with an insane 360 degree view of Mount Langya and the surrounding forest conservation area.. A glass path hovering above the rocky valley leads you up on to the circular deck, where you can enjoy the panorama views (if you are brave enough!).

No 7: Mount Hua Shan, Shaanxi

This cliff climbing adventure will have you gripping the mountain face as you tiptoe across wooden planks seemingly held together with giant staples. It’s been called world’s most dangerous hike, but the views and cup of tea at the top of the mountain’s southern peak are worth the ‘hike’.

No 6: Jinmao Tower Skywalk, Shanghai

Ever dreamed about walking in the sky? This Shanghai attraction has got you covered. At the top of this 88-story tower (the third tallest building in China), you can take a casual wander in the open air and enjoy the views of the lively city below. And of course it has a glass-bottom to complete the illusions that you are airborne.

No 5: Dinoconda, Jiangsu

For all you roller coaster veterans, it will come as no surprise to include the world’s fastest 4th dimensional roller coaster at this infamous dinosaur-themed park.  Get ready to ROAR as you travel at a mighty 80mph, thrown and rotated in the air by a dino-monster.

No 4: Bungee Jumping at the AJ Hackett Macau Tower, Macau

This bungee jump is the world’s highest, jumping from 233m high and has revolutionised safety equipment for bungee jumping.  Prepare to feel like a giant bird swooping down to earth as you freefall until just 30 metres from earth.

No 3: Cable Car Tianmen Shan (Heaven’s Gate Mountain), Hunan

Connecting China’s scenic town of Zhangjiajie and Tianmen, the world’s longest cable car takes a total of 28 minutes from start to end. What could be an immensely enjoyable journey, could also be someone’s introduction to acrophobia as it gets as steep as 38 degrees and ascends and descends a total of 1,279 meters.

No 2: Coiling Dragon Cliff Walkway, Hunan 

Complementing the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon Glass Bridge at No 1, this 1.6 metre wide glass path coils around the Tianmen Mountain and hangs over a sheer drop . It’s not for the faint hearted, but would you really want to miss out

No 1: Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon Glass Bridge, Hunan

At 430 metres long and 300 metres above ground, this is the world’s longest and highest glass bridge. Don’t even consider it if you are scared of heights, but if you can hold yourself together till you get to the other side, you are promised some spectacular views

Go on, what have we missed?  China and its attractions are ever changing so help us keep up to date by adding your opinions in the comments.

What’s so ‘Great’ about the Great Wall? A History of the Great Wall of China

News and Travel Editor

What’s so great about the Great Wall of China and why does it deserve its name?

Its size? The average height of the wall is 7.8 metres and the highest point is 14 metres.

Its length?  The total length of all sections of wall built throughout the dynasties reaches 13,170 miles. If stretched out in a straight line, the Great Wall could travel almost half way around the equator.

Its weight? Some people estimate an incredible 58,095,000 tons! That’s 9 times heavier than the collective weight of the Great Pyramids of Giza.

Or was it known by a different name when it was built and simply became the ‘Great Wall’ as time passed? We hope to answer all these questions and more by separating the facts from the legends and myths.

The Great Wall was, and remains, the longest man-made construction in the world. This might explain why today we’ve refer to it  as ‘Great’, but when it was built, it was simply known as the ‘Long Wall’ or ‘Long City’, as it was simply seen as a stretched out, giant, city wall.

Unsurprisingly, it is one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World, can we hyperlink this alongside Machu Picchu in Peru, the Colosseum in Italy and Petra in Jordan. But it was not built over one time period. Instead, the Great Wall has been built, modified or extended for around 2,000 years since the 7th and 8th centuries after regular invasions from the Mongols in the north.

We’ve all heard stories of workers being buried under the wall, but there are many other entertaining legends and myths surrounding the structure. The stories are incredibly wide-ranging and perhaps the most entertaining has been featured in a recent Hollywood-Chinese movie starring Matt Damon. The Great Wall film plays with the myth that the wall was not intended for keeping out the Mongol invaders from the north, but was in fact needed to protect China from supernatural forces.

But our all time favourite story is one that we think might just have a little bit of truth in it;

The Legend of Yi Kaizhan tells the story of the Yi, a mathematician who explained that it would take exactly 99,999 bricks to build the section of wall at Jiayuguan Pass in Gansu Province. His supervisor argued that if he was wrong, the entire workforce would be forced to do 3 years hard labour as punishment. Guess what? It took 99,998. Thankfully, good old Yi had a trick up his sleeve.  Even though the left over brick hadn’t been used in the construction, Yi quickly suggested that a supernatural being had placed it close by and that moving it would force the wall to collapse. Suspicious, the supervisor never moved the brick and, legend has it, the brick can still be found in the same spot today…

Whilst we can’t vouch for this story, one thing we can say is that, unfortunately and contrary to popular belief, the wall cannot be seen from space. This is probably because the original statement was made before anyone actually went into space… Even NASA admit that the Great Wall becomes somewhat less great when photographed from a low earth orbit.

Finally, did you also know that the wall is not really an ‘it’ but more of a ‘them’? The wall was very much built in sections, with many overlapping and some more ancient and wild sections crumbling away. That might also be because many sections of the wall are not built from bricks and mortar, but are sometimes moulded from the earth to create humps in the ground which are often reshaped by the weather.

Have you visited the Great Wall recently? Can you vouch for any of these stories? Please let us know if you go to Jiayuguan and find that famous supernatural brick still sitting there…

Harbin Ice Festival 2017: In Pictures

News and Travel Editor

The world famous Harbin Ice Festival is well underway in China’s northernmost province, Heilongjiang. We have been treated to some spectacular sights in the past and this year is no exception. Check out some of the stunning shots captured at this year’s festival so far.

This is the 33rd Harbin Ice Festival since its inception in 1963. At the start of every festival, an ice sculpture competition is held, showcasing some brilliant creations. Although the Harbin Ice Sculpture Competition is over for this year, the festival itself won’t finish until February 25th, so there’s still plenty of time to take in the sights across the 200 acre park.

Here are our favourite images so far of this year’s festival.

Fireworks erupt at the opening ceremony on January 5th.

Did you know that many of the blocks used for the sculptures were taken from Harbin’s Songhua River?

Did you double take just then? That’s right, some of the sculptures are actually designed into slides for the public. Just make sure you’re wrapped up warm for this one…

Many of the sculptures are inspired by Chinese folk tales and global landmarks. with the Egyptian Sphynx making regular appearances.

The Harbin Snow Festival has become one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world. The festival attracted over 1 million visitors last year.

18 couples have so far braved the cold in Harbin to get married, but that’s not the most daring this to happen at the festival this year…

Swimming competitions take place in a pool cut out of the frozen Songhua River. Just looking at this makes me feel cold.

Next week, our very own Coco will be giving you some top tips on stocking up for your Chinese New Year celebrations as you get ready to welcome in the Year of the Rooster. We’ll also take a look at some of the myths and legends surrounding Chinese New Year, including what NOT to do if you’re given a red money envelope…

Living the Dream in China: A New Year’s Resolution

News and Travel Editor

Happy 2017!  As we fast approach the Chinese New Year and the Year of the Rooster, it’s the perfect time to reflect back on the past year, as well as think of a couple of those dreaded New Year Resolutions…

Fear not! Here at China Icons, we can think of one that’s a bit more exciting than heading to the gym everyday for a week before giving up until next year. If your resolutions include travelling or even relocating, there’s never been a better time to make China a part of your itinerary.

Whether you want to go to China to teach, be an entrepreneur, study at a Chinese university, or simply travel, China has it all. It’s a country where the ancient and the modern coalesce  The most popular destinations for many travellers include Beijing, Guangzhou and Shanghai, where old traditions and fast-paced modern life intertwine perfectly. This is probably why it’s estimated that 600,000 foreigners currently live in China, as well as having 328,000 foreign students in 2012.

We have the perfect insight into travellers who have followed their dream in China, with many opting to permanently settle there. Many  of our China Icons videos explore the stories of these people, from Pol, a Turkish Games Designer, to Lee, a Television Presenter and Writer. We want to share the very best with you and to hopefully give you some inspiration on how you can follow your dream in China.

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A Games Designer in China

Turkish Games Designer, Pol, based himself in Guangzhou at the heart of the gaming development community. Go behind the scenes with Pol and find out more about what you can get up to in Guangzhou when the sun goes down.

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Lee’s Life in Beijing

Lee is a British Television Presenter and Writer and moved to Beijing when he was 26 years old. Lee explains how he started his own TV series analysing film reviews.

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Marion’s Life in Tibet

Now we head away from the big cities with Marion, who moved to Tibet from France and trained herself to become a mountain climber and even had the chance to take on the awe-inspiring Mt. Everest. Marion explains what attracted her to Tibet’s fascinating landscape and culture.

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Stunning embroidery of China’s Miao People

Fiona is an Australian ER Doctor, but moved to China to become a food writer and photo blogger. Watch below to find out more about Fiona’s journey to visit the Miao People and their amazing traditions.

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War Horse Theatre Director Alex Sims

War Horse has become a worldwide phenomenon and British Theatre Director, Alex Sims, has taken it to China. Go behind the scenes of the National Theatre of China and one of the biggest theatre productions in the world.

 

Do you fancy your hand in any of these professions? Are you travelling to China this year and have these videos persuaded you to maybe stay a little longer? Let us know in the comments below!

Check in next week for an insight into this year’s, world famous, Harbin Ice Festival and take a look at some of the stunning sculptures making an appearance this year.

Hong Kong – the city of record breakers

News and Travel Editor

Hong Kong always takes our breath away and is a favourite winter destination.

But don’t just take our word for it! Here are some record breaking reasons why you need to plan a trip to Hong Kong.

Hong Kong’s skyline is staggering, with more skyscrapers than any other city on the planet. More people live and work above the 14th floor here than in any other city in the world!

To get around, you have the biggest double decker tram fleet at your disposal…. Plus more Rolls Royces per person than any other city. Although you might need to seek alternative transport to reach Hong Kong’s 200 plus islands…!

When you’ve recovered from all that island hopping, marvel at the biggest nightly show of light and sound in the ‘Symphony of Lights’ at Victoria Harbour.

Want more tips on things to do in Hong Kong?
Callum’s 72 hour selfie has you sorted

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