Category Archives: Science and Technology

China’s Smart Glasses

News and Travel Editor

China is famous for inventions. Gunpowder, paper, printing and the marine compass are often regarded as the four great inventions of Ancient China. Kites, umbrellas, toilet paper and ketchup are some less well-known examples of Chinese innovation.

In this week’s upload, we are joined by tech and travel blogger Hyper Trypsy as he investigates the latest invention-making waves in the tech scene in China and around the world, augmented reality glasses. Hyper Trypsy is invited to explore Beijing based tech company Alto Tech and try on their Cool Glasses.

The glasses will cost between $280 and $430, much cheaper than other Augmented Reality glasses on the market. The wearable tech allows you to text, make calls, navigate, take photos and even record HD video. A touchpad on the side allows users to control the device by swiping through an interface displayed on the screen. The glasses can also be controlled using voice recognition.

What’s the future for augmented reality and wearable tech? Alto Tech believe that their affordable headsets will make what once seemed a novelty become essential to everyday life. Imagine  being able to read recipes as you cook, get directions whilst taking in the views and record a special moment without watching it through a screen. Hyper Trypsy puts the glasses to the test on the Great Wall of China and gives us his verdict. Would you want them on your next trip? Let us know in the comments below!

For more from Hyper Trypsy, say hello on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram!

 

Solar Valley

China’s Green Revolution

Features Editor

On camera, HUANG MING appears a small, softly-spoken man. But beneath this grandfather’s persona lie great ambition and drive. During our interview he jokes about his nickname as ‘the solar energy mad man’. He is, in fact, the founder of one of the world’s most successful solar energy companies.

 

We meet Huang Ming at the SUN AND MOON BUILDING, the eye-catching centrepiece of SOLAR VALLEY and HQ for his company Himin Solar Energy Group. Huang Ming has spent the last thirty years building both his company and Solar Valley up from scratch. Today, Himin Solar is the world’s biggest producer of solar heaters as well a pioneer in the research and development of other everyday solar products. Goldman Sachs is among the company’s investors.

Like a proud father, Huang Ming lights up when he talks about the Sun and Moon building, describing it as one of his favourite buildings. It is an impressive, white semi-circular structure – its shape inspired by the pictographic characters for sun and moon. At night, photovoltaic powered LEDs light up its exterior, and inside, the hot water, heating, refrigeration is all solar-powered. The glass has been specially developed by Himin to insulate, capture natural light and provide sound-proofing. Across Dezhou, this impressive record continues. It has become a hub for green innovation, described by the International Solar Cities Congress as a ‘centre of gravity for renewable technologies’. The city hosts what Huang Ming believes to be the world’s first solar energy factory roof. Integrated solar thermal or photo-voltaic technology are in 95% of new buildings and solar water heater use in Dezhou exceeds 3 million square metres, approximately equal to the total amount installed in the EU and twice that of the US, according to the International Renewable Energy Agency.

More than 300km away, Himin’s technologies are also used in Beijing to power Mao Zedong’s Mausoleum. And across China, half the population use solar energy, making up 76% of the world’s solar consumption

But 30 years ago, it was all very different. Huang Ming worked in the oil industry and the Dezhou area was farmland. The 80s was a decade that changed Huang Ming’s life.

In 1985, recently married, Huang Ming took his new wife to his grandmother’s home in Wuxi, on the journey regaling her with tales of the beauty of the city’s Tai Lake. But when they arrived, the lake was dank, black, and smelly. Huang Ming was stung by the disappointment of his new bride, as well as the loss of this natural beauty.

The birth of his daughter followed several years after and Huang Ming became anxious about how her life would be without fossil fuel and clear skies. With the support of his wife, he decided to plough his savings and time into solar energy research. And so began his dream to create Solar Valley.

Solar Valley
As Huang Ming shows us round Dezhou in his green, company boiler jacket, he talks about his dreams for China. He is the first to admit that the innovations at Solar Valley might not always be the best, but they are the first. His Sun and Moon Mansion uses 10% of the energy used in conventional buildings. “Imagine, “ he says, “if electricity consumption could be cut to 10% of what we use today, we could solve environmental problems like pollution and the energy crisis.”

So, can China prosper AND step away from renewables?

The solar energy entrepreneurs in Dezhou generate an annual turnover of more than $3 billion USD.

 

 

Luming Park and China’s Green Revolution

Features Editor

Strolling through a sea of sunflowers, landscape architect DR YU KONG JIAN looks like any other Chinese tourist, dressed casually in a red polo-neck and shorts. But his attention to detail gives him away – he stops to inspect the flowers, and checks the sections of walkway designed to carry visitors around the 31- hectare park.

Luming Park is one of dozens of projects that the award-winning Yu Kong Jian has designed and created for cities around the world. Educated at Harvard, where he went on to be a professor before returning to China, and now Dean of Beijing University’s College of Architecture and Landscape, and founder of landscape design company Turenscape, Dr Yu describes his work as ‘an art of survival.’

He believes that we can, and must, reconnect the 50% of humans who now live in cities with Nature. This means not only enabling city-dwellers to reap the emotional and spiritual benefits of bringing Nature back into their lives; but also working with Nature to solve many of the problems that industrial development and urbanization have brought to cities around the world.

Dr Yu was inspired by his own personal experiences. Growing up during the Cultural Revolution, Yu spent years working on the farm – experiencing firsthand the seasonal cycles of Nature and enjoying the rhythms of the countryside.His father instilled in him the ethos that every piece of land must be productive. City parks – the closest many urban dwellers get to the refreshment of Nature – seem to Yu to be a contradiction in terms. They appear to be about the natural world but in fact almost everything in Chinese public parks is unnatural. The plants have been cultivated for beauty rather than fertility, and so are sterile and can bear no fruit. Many of the trees and popular flowers planted – like roses for example – are not native to China and so require constant watering to survive, thus exacerbating China’s problems with drought. Yu likens this highly-managed garden aesthetic to the old Chinese obsession with tiny, bound feet. In contrast, in his park designs this “little feet” aesthetic is rejected in favour of “messy nature” – where native plants, trees and bushes that bear fruit and take little management are planted rather than sterile flowers.

Yu takes his passion for Nature a step further – with his “sponge city” concept. An idea that originated in the US, it resonated instantly with Yu. China suffers from drought, flash floods and water pollution and Yu believes “sponge city” design can help mitigate all three problems, simply by working hand in hand with Nature. Quzhou park in Zhejiang province is part of a large-scale “sponge city” project on the river Wu, one of 16 pilot projects across China. First, the team demolished the concrete flood barriers that had bordered the river and replaced them with earth banks, into which they cut terraces. These natural flood defences have the effect of slowing down floodwaters. Concrete flood barriers tend to speed floodwater up, increasing the danger of flash flooding downsteam. The earthen terraces absorb rising floodwater slowly, and then, like a sponge, release it in times of drought. The new recreational parks along the river were designed – in Yu’s words – to “make friends with the flood.” Rather than trying to keep the floodwater out of the park, Yu’s design has a network of high level walkways and bridges that enable people to enjoy the park even when it is inundated by the river. What’s more, every time the parks get flooded, the soil is enriched by sediment washed in from the river which helps the plants flourish. Unlike imported park plants, these local species need little help to survive. In fact, many of the native reeds that Yu has planted on the riverbank have an additional benefit – the ability to cleanse the river water of pollution. After generations of flood, drought and pollution, this sustainable landscape design is beginning to restore the balance to rivers and to the cities on their banks.

This blog is taken from an indepth article on China’s Green Revolution, originally written by China Icons for China Eye Magazine

The biggest Radio Telescope in the world

News and Travel Editor

This is the Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical Telescope (F.A.S.T for short), or at least it will be when it’s completed in September this year.

This silver giant in remote Guizhou Province is the world’s largest Radio Telescope, eclipsing the previous title-holder by THREE TIMES its size. This means that the paraboloid reflective dish will be able to detect signals 1000 light-years away, enabling scientists to see three times further than ever before.

What is it searching for? Well, for starters, the telescope will be looking for ancient signals of hydrogen to try to understand how the universe evolved. It will also be on the look out for never-before-seen stars, and of course, extra terrestrial life. What will we find when we look further into space than ever before? Will existing theories about the origins of the universe be confirmed or thrown into confusion? Am I going to get to meet E.T.?!

The telescope comes as part of a tide of innovation coming from China, which includes world-leading advances in A.I, driverless cars and even eye transplants. To get a visual example of this rapid technological advances, look at the development of Shenzhen over the last 40 years, from small fishing village to a rival for Silicon Valley!

The country that invented the compass, papermaking, printing and gunpowder is definitely experiencing a Scientific revival, and I’m excited to find out what the future holds.